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Below are descriptions of Aromatherapy supplied by the Online Wellness Network wellness providers listed on this web site.

DISCLAIMER

Aromatherapy is by no means a new discovery – in fact, it has been practiced all over the world for centuries.

Aromatherapy is the art and science of utilizing essential oils for relieving symptoms in the physical body. These essential oils are derived from grasses, buds, peels, branches, needles, bark, leaves, seeds, berries, flowers, roots, fruits, woods, herbs, spices.

Aromatherapy promotes health of body, peacefulness of mind, helps the negative emotions to rest and by workin
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Aromatherapy is the use of fragrant Therapeutic Essential Oils, extracted from plant material, to encourage good health, equilibrium and well-being. Be sure to look at the qualifications of the Aromatherpist you are working with, as yet there are no legal requirements for licencing in Canada nor the USA. Aromatherapists do not diagnose medical conditions, only your Medical or Naturopathic doctor can do this. Aromatherpists practice a modality where they work with Therapeutic Essential Oils.
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Aromatherapy, as its name suggests, is a therapy of aromas, the aromas of therapeutic plants concentrated In the form of essential oils. These pure extracts are the basis and tools of Aromatherapy.

Many people use essential oils, like Lavender, Tea Tree and Eucalyptus, at home in their baths and oil burners. They have discovered the many therapeutic benefits of these pure, wonderful gifts of nature.

Aromatherapy treatments combine the therapeutic and fragrant properties of essent
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Aromatherapy is the use of Botanical Essential Oils for personal health and wellbeing.

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When we smell a true, pure essential oil, we breathe in the consciousness of the plant and access Nature’s immense power of self-regeneration.

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A gentle holistic treatment incorporating acupressure points and lymphatic drainage that integrates the life force energy of plants (essential oils), intentional therapeutic touch and your own body’s healing intelligence to create a synergistic healing of mind, body and spirit in a safe and nurturing space.

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Aromatherapy massage using specific oils for any particular problem is magnificent, specific oils can actually kill pain and are natural anti inflammatories, they can uplift your mood, ease depression,and make you feel totally relaxed. Combined with the massage it is a wonderful experience.

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Aromatherapy is the use of medicinal grade essential oils to help foster better health and relationships to self and others. It is a holistic treatment and works on all levels mental, physical, emotional and spiritual. It is amazing medicine if used properly.

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Aroamtherapy is the use of essential oils to aid the mind body and emotions of individuals and families. Using natural product produced by and obtained from plants many physical and emotional complaints can be combated.

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Aromatherapy is one of the most luxurious treatments for mind and body. The treatment combines massage with essential oils to enhance well-being, restore balance, soothe away tension, lift depression, fight infection and encourage healing.

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Aromatherapy Description

* This article is updated daily from Wikipedia. It may contain minor formatting errors.
For the original content and references, click here. Last update: 8/19/2013.

Aromatherapy is a form of alternative medicine that uses volatile plant materials, known as essential oils, and other aromatic compounds for the purpose of altering a person's mind, mood (psychology)|mood, cognitive function or health.

Some essential oils such as tea tree* have demonstrated anti-microbial effects, but there is still a lack of clinical evidence demonstrating efficacy against bacterial, fungal, or viral infections. Evidence for the efficacy of aromatherapy in treating medical conditions remains poor, with a particular lack of studies employing rigorous methodology,* but some evidence exists that essential oils may have therapeutic potential.*

History

Many such oils are described by Dioscorides, along with beliefs of the time regarding their healing properties, in his De Materia Medica, written in the first century.* Distilled essential oils have been employed as medicines since the invention of distillation in the eleventh century,* when Avicenna isolated essential oils using steam distillation.*The concept of aromatherapy was first mooted by a small number of European scientists and doctors, in about 1907. In 1937, the word first appeared in print in a French book on the subject: Aromathérapie: Les Huiles Essentielles, Hormones Végétales by :fr:René-Maurice Gattefossé|René-Maurice Gattefossé, a chemist. An English version was published in 1993.* In 1910, Gattefossé burned a hand very badly and later claimed he treated it effectively with lavender oil.*A French surgeon, :fr:Jean Valnet|Jean Valnet, pioneered the medicinal uses of essential oils, which he used as antiseptics in the treatment of wounded soldiers during World War II.*

Modes of application

The modes of application of aromatherapy include:
  • Aerial diffusion: for environmental fragrancing or aerial disinfection
  • Direct inhalation: for respiratory disinfection, decongestion, expectoration as well as psychological effects
  • Topical applications: for general massage, bath salts|baths, compresses, therapeutic skin care*

    Materials

    Some of the materials employed include:
  • Essential oils: Fragrant oils extracted from plants chiefly through steam distillation (e.g., eucalyptus oil) or expression (grapefruit oil). However, the term is also occasionally used to describe fragrant oils extracted from plant material by any solvent extraction.
  • Absolute (substance)|Absolutes: Fragrant oils extracted primarily from flowers or delicate plant tissues through solvent or supercritical fluid extraction (e.g., rose absolute). The term is also used to describe oils extracted from fragrant butters, concretes, and enfleurage pommades using ethanol.
  • Carrier oils: Typically oily plant base triacylglycerides that dilute essential oils for use on the skin (e.g., almond|sweet almond oil).
  • Herbal distillates or hydrosols: The aqueous by-products of the distillation process (e.g., rosewater). There are many herbs that make herbal distillates and they have culinary uses, medicinal uses and skin care uses. Common herbal distillates are chamomile, rose, and lemon balm.
  • Infusions: Aqueous extracts of various plant material (e.g., infusion of chamomile).
  • Phytoncides: Various volatile organic compounds from plants that kill microbes. Many terpene-based fragrant oils and sulfuric compounds from plants in the genus "Allium" are phytoncides, though the latter are likely less commonly used in aromatherapy due to their disagreeable odors.
  • Vaporizer (cannabis)|Vaporizer (Volatized) raw herbs: Typically higher oil content plant based materials dried, crushed, and heated to extract and inhale the aromatic oil vapors in a direct inhalation modality.

    Theory

    Aromatherapy is the treatment or prevention of disease by use of essential oils. Other stated uses include pain and anxiety reduction, enhancement of energy and short-term memory, relaxation, hair loss prevention, and reduction of eczema-induced itching.*

    Two basic mechanisms are offered to explain the purported effects. One is the influence of aroma on the brain, especially the limbic system through the olfactory system.* The other is the direct pharmacological effects of the essential oils.* While precise knowledge of the synergy between the body and aromatic oils is often claimed by aromatherapists, the efficacy of aromatherapy remains unproven. However, some preliminary clinical studies of aromatherapy in combination with other techniques show positive effects. Aromatherapy does not cure conditions, but helps the body to find a natural way to cure itself and improve immune response.*In the English-speaking world, practitioners tend to emphasize the use of oils in massage . Aromatherapy tends to be regarded as a complementary modality at best and a pseudoscience|pseudoscientific fraud at worst.*

    Choice and purchase

    Oils with standardized content of components (marked FCC, for Food Chemical Codex) are required to contain a specified amount of certain aroma chemicals that normally occur in the oil. There is no law that the chemicals cannot be added in synthetic form to meet the criteria established by the FCC for that oil. For instance, lemongrass essential oil must contain 75% aldehyde to meet the FCC profile for that oil, but that aldehyde can come from a chemical refinery instead of from lemongrass. To say that FCC oils are "food grade" makes them seem natural when they are not necessarily so.

    Undiluted essential oils suitable for aromatherapy are termed 'therapeutic grade', but there are no established and agreed standards for this category. The market for essential oils is dominated by the food, perfume, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries, so aromatherapists have little choice but to buy the best of whatever oils are available.

    Analysis using gas liquid chromatography (GLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) establishes the quality of essential oils. These techniques are able to measure the levels of components to a few parts per billion. This does not make it possible to determine whether each component is natural or whether a poor oil has been 'improved' by the addition of synthetic aromachemicals, but the latter is often signaled by the minor impurities present. For example, linalool made in plants will be accompanied by a small amount of hydro-linalool, whilst synthetic linalool has traces of dihydro-linalool.

    Popular uses

  • Lemon oil is uplifting and anti-stress/anti-depressant. In a Japanese study, lemon essential oil in vapour form has been found to reduce Stress (medicine)|stress in mouse|mice.* Research at The Ohio State University indicates that Lemon oil aroma may enhance one's mood, and help with relaxation.*
  • Thyme oil*
  • Peppermint oil is often used to deter ants, by applying a few drops on their trail.*
  • Both lavender and Tea tree oil are used as antiseptics, sometimes in lotions or soaps. Lavender oil is said to help heal wounds and burns.
  • Lavender, Jasmine, Chamomile and Peppermint are used for anti-stress, anti-anxiety and as an anti-depressant.
  • Sage oil has been suggested to boost short-term memory performance in many using it as a dietary supplement.*

    Efficacy

    There is little evidence to date about the efficacy of aromatherapy.

    Martin et al. (1996) concluded that most of the clinical trials suffered from various confounding factors, such as a lack of adequate control, small sample sizes, and lack of repetition by independent researchers. As well, many are served in conjunction with other possible influencers. One example being Kuritama et al.'s (2005) experiment where the psychological benefits of aromatherapy massage was compared to massage alone. Once the tests and questionnaire measures were evaluated there showed a significant reduction in anxiety and self-ranked depression, though there was no difference between the two groups.

    Aromatherapists tend to back up their belief in their practice by saying that one cannot confirm or reject their methods by using scientific approaches, because science is reductionist and that aromatherapy depends on a holistic method (Schnaubelt 1998).

    Some benefits that have been linked to aromatherapy, such as relaxation and clarity of mind, may arise from the placebo effect rather than from any actual physiological effect. The consensus among most medical professionals is that while some aromas have demonstrated effects on mood and relaxation and may have related benefits for patients, there is currently insufficient evidence to support the claims made for aromatherapy.* Scientific research on the cause and effects of aromatherapy is limited, although in vitro testing has revealed some antibacterial and Antiviral drug|antiviral effects.* There is no evidence of any long-term results from an aromatherapy massage other than the pleasure achieved from a pleasant-smelling massage.* A few double blind studies in the field of clinical psychology relating to the treatment of severe dementia have been published.* Essential oils have a demonstrated efficacy in dental mouthwash products.*Mainstream literature suggests that aromatherapy is based on the anecdotal evidence of its benefits rather than proof that aromatherapy can cure diseases. Scientists and medical professionals acknowledge that aromatherapy has limited scientific support, but critics argue that the claims of most aromatherapy practitioners go beyond the data, and/or that the studies are neither adequately controlled nor peer reviewed.

    Some proponents of aromatherapy believe that the claimed effect of each type of oil is not caused by the chemicals in the oil interacting with the senses, but because the oil contains a distillation of the "Vitalism|life force" of the plant from which it is derived that will "balance the energies" of the body and promote healing or well-being by "purging negative vibrations" from the body's "energy field". Arguing that there is no scientific method|scientific evidence that healing can be achieved or that the claimed "energies" even exist, many scientific skepticism|skeptics reject this form of aromatherapy as pseudoscience.

    Safety concerns

    In addition, there are potential Alternative medicine#Criticism|safety concerns. Because essential oils are highly concentrated they can irritate the skin when used in undiluted form.* Therefore, they are normally diluted with a carrier oil for topical application, such as jojoba oil, olive oil, or coconut oil. phototoxicity|Phototoxic reactions may occur with citrus peel oils such as lemon or Lime (fruit)|lime.* Also, many essential oils have chemical components that are Stimulus (physiology)|sensitisers (meaning that they will after a number of uses cause reactions on the skin, and more so in the rest of the body). Some of the chemical allergies could even be caused by pesticides, if the original plants are cultivated.* Some oils can be toxic to some domestic animals, with cats being particularly prone.*Two common oils, lavender and Melaleuca alternifolia|tea tree, have been implicated in causing gynaecomastia, an abnormal breast tissue growth, in prepubescent boys, although the report which cites this potential issue is based on observations of only three boys (and so is not a scientific study), and two of those boys were significantly above average in weight for their age, thus already prone to gynaecomastia.* A child hormone specialist at the University of Cambridge claimed "... these oils can mimic estrogens" and "people should be a little bit careful about using these products."* The study has been criticised on many different levels by many authorities. The Aromatherapy Trade Council of the UK has issued a rebuttal* The Australian Tea Tree Association, a group that promotes the interests of Australian tea tree oil producers, exporters and manufacturers issued a letter that questioned the study and called on the New England Journal of Medicine for a retraction (ATTIA).* The New England Journal of Medicine has so far not replied and has not retracted the study.

    As with any bioactive substance, an essential oil that may be safe for the general public could still pose hazards for pregnant and lactating women.

    While some advocate the ingestion of essential oils for therapeutic purposes, licensed aromatherapy professionals do not recommend self prescription due the highly toxic nature of some essential oils. Some very common oils like Eucalyptus are extremely toxic when taken internally. Doses as low as one teaspoon have been reported to cause clinically significant symptoms and severe poisoning can occur after ingestion of 4 to 5 ml.* A few reported cases of toxic reactions like liver damage and seizures have occurred after ingestion of sage, hyssop, thuja, and cedar.* Accidental ingestion may happen when oils are not kept out of reach of children.

    Oils both ingested and applied to the skin can potentially have negative interaction with conventional medicine. For example, the topical use of methyl salicylate heavy oils like Sweet Birch and Wintergreen may cause hemorrhaging in users taking the anticoagulant Warfarin.

    Adulterated oils may also pose problems depending on the type of substance used.
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    * This article is updated daily from Wikipedia. It may contain minor formatting errors.
    For the original content and references, click here. Last update: 8/19/2013.

     
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