A COMPLETE RESOURCE FOR HOLISTIC HEALTH AND WELL BEING  
Services for Wellness SeekersServices for Wellness ProvidersLogin Report a Bug Follow us on Twitter Visit Our Facebook Page Join Our LinkedIn Group Stumble On Share This Website
Create an Account
  

Below are descriptions of Kundalini Yoga supplied by the Online Wellness Network wellness providers listed on this web site.

DISCLAIMER

Kundalini Yoga is a form of yoga which emphasizes breathing, is usually done with eyes closed to contain the energy, and uses mantra and asana in speciic sequences for specific purposes.

Larger View
Flag this:

(0)


Kundalini Yoga is one of the power yoga styles. It is "concentrated Yoga" and transforms one’s energy intensely, yet enjoyably.

Larger View
Flag this:

(0)


Kundalini Yoga is a rapid and effective technology to enhance the entire nervous system, glandular system, and brain chemistry. The word "kundalini" means awareness and manifesting the hidden potential of that awareness. In the yogic tradition Kundalini energy is portrayed as a coiled serpent lying dormant at the base of the spine. To raise the Kundalini means to awaken and enliven this creative energy.

Larger View
Flag this:

(0)


Kundalini is a dynamic energizing form of yoga, which strengthens the central nervous system to build up your immune system and well-being. It brings you to an experience of your "Total Self" - which is unlimited and free of fear.

Larger View
Flag this:

(0)


Kundalini is a dynamic energizing form of yoga which strengthens your immune system and overall health. It brings you to an experience of your "Total Self" - which is unlimited and free of fear.

Larger View
Flag this:

(0)


Submit a Description

Kundalini Yoga Description

* This article is updated daily from Wikipedia. It may contain minor formatting errors.
For the original content and references, click here. Last update: 8/18/2013.

Kundalini yoga (Sanskrit ), also known as laya yoga is a school of yoga. It has been described as a branch of yoga influenced by the tantra and shakta schools of Hinduism by Sivananda Saraswati in 1935. and was popularized from the 1960s by Harbhajan Singh Yogi|Harbhajan Singh (also known as "Yogi Bhajan") and his "3HO|Healthy, Happy, Holy Organization (3HO)" (established 1969).

Called by practitioners "the yoga of awareness", it focuses on "the expansion of sensory awareness and intuition in order to raise individual consciousness" and aims "to cultivate the creative spiritual potential of a human to uphold values, speak truth, and focus on the compassion and consciousness needed to serve and heal others."*
"Kundalini Yoga consists of active and passive asana-based kriyas, pranayama, and meditations which target the whole body system (nervous system, glands, mental faculties, chakras) to develop awareness, consciousness and spiritual strength." —Yogi Bhajan*

History

Name

What has become known as "Kundalini yoga" in the 20th century, after a technical term peculiar to this tradition, has otherwise been known as laya yoga (? ?), from the Sanskrit term laya "dissolution, extinction". The Sanskrit adjective means "circular, annular". It does occur as a noun for "a snake" (in the sense "coiled", as in "forming ringlets") in the 12th-century Rajatarangini chronicle (I.2). , a noun with the meaning "bowl, water-pot" is found as the name of a Naga|Naga in Mahabharata 1.4828. The feminine ku?ali has the meaning of "ring, bracelet, coil (of a rope)" in Classical Sanskrit, and is used as the name of a "serpent-like" Shakti in Tantrism as early as c. the 11th century, in the Saradatilaka.* This concept is adopted as ku?alnii as a technical term into Hatha yoga in the 15th century and becomes widely used in the Yoga Upanishads by the 16th century.

Hatha yoga

The Yoga-Kundalini Upanishad is listed in the Muktika canon of 108 Upanishads. Since this canon was fixed in the year 1656, it is known that the Yoga-Kundalini Upanishad was compiled in the first half of the 17th century at the latest. The Upanishad more likely dates to the 16th century, as do other Sanskrit texts which treat kundalini as a technical term in tantric yoga, such as the ?a?-cakra-nirupana and the Paduka-pańcaka. These latter texts were translated in 1919 by John Woodroffe as The Serpent Power: The Secrets of Tantric and Shaktic Yoga In this book, he was the first to indentify "Kundalini yoga" as a particular form of Tantrik Yoga, also known as Laya Yoga.

The Yoga-Kundalini and the Yogatattva Upanishad|Yogatattva are closely related texts from the school of Hatha yoga. They both draw heavily on the Yoga Yajnavalkya (c. 13th century),* as does the foundational Hatha Yoga Pradipika. They are part of a tendency of syncretism combining the tradition of yoga with other schools of Hindu philosophy during the 15th and 16th centuries. The Yoga-Kundalini Upanishad itself consists of three short chapters; it begins by stating that Chitta (consciousness) is controlled by Prana|Vayu (Prana), and Prana is controlled by moderate food, postures and Shakti-Chala (I.1-2). Verses I.3-6 explain the concepts of moderate food and concept, and verse I.7 introduces Kundalini as the name of the Shakti under discussion: :I.7. The Sakti (mentioned above) is only Kundalini. A wise man should take it up from its place (Viz., the navel, upwards) to the middle of the eyebrows. This is called Sakti-Chala. :I.8. In practising it, two things are necessary, Sarasvati-Chalana and the restraint of Prana (breath). Then through practice, Kundalini (which is spiral) becomes straightened."*

Modern reception

Swami Nigamananda (d. 1935) taught a form of laya yoga which he insisted was not part of Hatha yoga, paving the way of the emergence of "Kundalini yoga" as a distinct school of yoga.

"Kundalini Yoga" as it is taught today is based on the treatise Kundalini Yoga by Sivananda Saraswati, published in 1935. Swami Sivananda (1935) introduced "Kundalini yoga" as a part of Laya yoga.* Together with other currents of Hindu revivalism and Neo-Hinduism, Kundalini Yoga became popular in 1960s to 1980s western counterculture. It was popularized by Harbhajan Singh Yogi who founded the "3HO|Healthy, Happy, Holy Organization" (3HO) in 1969. Singh launched a pilot program with two longtime heroin addicts in Washington, D.C. in 1972,* and opened a drug-treatment center under the name of "3HO SuperHealth" was launched in Tucson, Arizona in 1973.

The Kundalini Research Institute (KRI) was established by Singh in 1972 and continues to govern the certification of Kundalini yoga teachers. KRI publishes The Aquarian Teacher in two volumes as required for "instructor" level necessary to teach beginners' classes. According to 3HO, a total of 5,000 people (the vast majority being women) have attained "instructor" certification between 1972 and 2010.*

Principles and methodology

Kundalini is the term for "a Vitalism|spiritual energy or life force located at the base of the spine", conceptualized as a coiled-up serpent. The practice of Kundalini yoga is supposed to arouse the sleeping Kundalini Shakti from its coiled base through the 6 chakras, and penetrate the 7th chakra, or crown. This energy is said to travel along the ida (left), pingala (right) and central, or sushumna Nadi (yoga)|nadi - the main channels of pranic energy in the body.*Kundalini energy is technically explained as being sparked during yogic breathing when prana and Prana#The Five Pra?as|apana blends at the 3rd chakra (naval center) at which point it initially drops down to the 1st and 2nd chakras before traveling up to the spine to the higher centers of the brain to activate the golden cord - the connection between the pituitary and pineal glands - and penetrate the 7 chakras.* Borrowing and integrating the highest forms from many different approaches, Kundalini Yoga can be understood as a tri-fold approach of Bhakti yoga for devotion, Shakti|Shakti yoga for power, and Raja yoga for mental power and control. Its purpose through the daily practice of kriyas and meditation in sadhana are described a practicaltechnology of human consciousness for humans to achieve their total creative potential.*

Practice

The practice of kriyas and meditations in Kundalini Yoga are designed to raise complete body awareness to prepare the body, nervous system, and mind to handle the energy of Kundalini rising. The majority of the physical postures focus on navel activity, activity of the spine, and selective pressurization of body points and meridians. Breath work and the application of bhandas (3 yogic locks) aid to release, direct and control the flow of Kundalini energy from the lower centers to the higher energetic centers.*Along with the many kriyas, meditations and practices of Kundalini Yoga, a simple breathing technique of alternate nostril breathing (left nostril, right nostril) is taught as a method to cleanse the nadis, or subtle channels and pathways, to help awaken Kundalini energy.*Sovatsky (1998) adapts a developmental and evolutionary perspective in his interpretation of Kundalini Yoga. That is, he interprets Kundalini Yoga as a catalyst for psycho-spiritual growth and bodily maturation. According to this interpretation of yoga, the body bows itself into greater maturation [...], none of which should be considered mere stretching exercises.*

Medical research

  • Psychiatric literature notes that "Since the influx of eastern spiritual practices and the rising popularity of meditation starting in 1960s, many people have experienced a variety of psychological difficulties, either while engaged in intensive spiritual practice or spontaneously".* Some of the psychological difficulties associated with intensive spiritual practice are claimed to be "kundalini awakening", "a complex physio-psychospiritual transformative process described in the yogic tradition". Writers in the fields of near-death studies and of "transpersonal psychology" have described a "kundalini syndrome".*
  • Venkatesh et al. (1997)* studied twelve kundalini (chakra) meditators, using the Phenomenology (philosophy)|Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory. They found that the practice of meditation "appears to produce structural as well as intensity changes in phenomenological experiences of consciousness".
  • Lazar et al. (2000)*
  • Previous PREVIOUS  |  READ MORE Next   1 through 5 of 5

    * This article is updated daily from Wikipedia. It may contain minor formatting errors.
    For the original content and references, click here. Last update: 8/18/2013.

     
    Siri Om Kaur: Kundalini Yoga
    Lacey, WA , USA
    Click here to like Siri Om Kaur: Kundalini Yoga(0)
    View Profile
    Susan Wilkens, RYT, CMI: Dancing Cranes Yoga & Massage
    Forest Park, IL , United States
    Click here to like Susan Wilkens, RYT, CMI: Dancing Cranes Yoga & Massage(?)
    View Profile
    Tom Wilkens, RYT, LMT: Dancing Cranes Yoga & Massage
    Forest Park, IL , United States
    Click here to like Tom Wilkens, RYT, LMT: Dancing Cranes Yoga & Massage(?)
    View Profile
    Nicole Ohebshalom, RN, CHHC
    37 West 39th Street, #404, NY , United States
    Click here to like Nicole Ohebshalom, RN, CHHC(?)
    View Profile
    Siri Om Kaur: Kundalini Yoga
    Lacey, WA , USA
    Click here to like Siri Om Kaur: Kundalini Yoga(?)
    View Profile
    Mrs. Anandi Diane Marie Landall, EYT, RYT: Yoga With Diane
    Plymouth, MA , United States
    Click here to like Mrs. Anandi Diane Marie Landall, EYT, RYT: Yoga With Diane(?)
    Price Range: $10 - $100
    Price Range:
    $10 - $100
    View Profile
    Wellness Journal

     
     

    Link to Online Wellness Network!

     

    Photography by Jay Ligda: http://jay2.ligda.net/photos Photography by Jay Ligda: http://jay2.ligda.net/photos Photography by Jay Ligda: http://jay2.ligda.net/photos Photography by Jay Ligda: http://jay2.ligda.net/photos Photography by Jay Ligda: http://jay2.ligda.net/photos