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Below are descriptions of Acupressure supplied by the Online Wellness Network wellness providers listed on this web site.

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Acupressure is a modality that focuses on the entire system, ie, Mind, Body and Spirit. It brings the above into line and creates a system that will function at it’s highest potential.

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Application of pressure on Acupuncture Points by various modalities helps to regulate the ’Qi’ and initiate inherent natural healing.

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by using the body’s energetic meridian systems, like acupuncture, acupressure introduces changes in the body based on energy flow.

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Acupressure uses finger pressure (instead of needles) to influence and balance the energy that flows through the points on the meridians. Traditional Chinese Medicine maintains that when this flow is blocked, illness results, so keeping the meridians open and flowing supports the overall health of the body as well as the organs associated with each meridian.

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Self Acupressure is a great tool for healing and bringing harmony to the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual aspects of one’s life.

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Traditional Chinese method of applying pressure and massage to specific "energy points" on the body to relieve tension.

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Acupressure Description

* This article is updated daily from Wikipedia. It may contain minor formatting errors.
For the original content and references, click here. Last update: 8/19/2013.

Acupressure [from Latin acus "needle" (see acuity) + pressure (n.).] is an alternative medicine technique similar in principle to Acupuncture. It is based on the concept of life energy which flows through "meridians" in the body. In treatment, physical pressure is applied to trigger points with the aim of clearing blockages in these meridians. Pressure may be applied by hand, by elbow, or with various devices.

Some medical studies have suggested that acupressure may be effective at helping manage nausea and vomiting, or for helping lower back pain. According to Quackwatch acupressure is a dubious practice, and its practitioners use irrational methods.*

Background

Acupoints used in treatment may or may not be in the same area of the body as the targeted symptom. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory for the selection of such points and their effectiveness is that they work by stimulating the Meridian (Chinese medicine)|meridian system to bring about relief by rebalancing Yin and yang|yin, Yin and yang|yang and qi (also spelled "chi"). This theory is based on the paradigm of TCM.

Many East Asian martial arts also make extensive study and use of acupressure for self-defense and health purposes, (chin na, tui na). The points or combinations of points are said to be used to manipulate or incapacitate an opponent. Also, martial artists regularly massage their own acupressure points in routines to remove blockages from their own meridians, claiming to thereby enhance their circulation and flexibility and keeping the points "soft" or less vulnerable to an attack.

Reception

A 2011 systematic review of acupressure's effectiveness at treating symptoms reported that 16 out of 23 studies had concluded that acupressure was effective, but that that the evaluation also "indicated a significant likelihood of bias" in the studies.* A 2011 Cochrane review of trials using acupuncture and acupressure to control pain in childbirth concluded that "acupuncture or acupressure may help relieve pain during labour, but more research is needed".*An acupressure wristband that is claimed to relieve the symptoms of motion sickness and other forms of nausea provides pressure to the P6 acupuncture point, a point that has been extensively investigated.* The Cochrane Collaboration, a group of evidence-based medicine (EBM) reviewers, reviewed the use of P6 for nausea and vomiting, and found it to be effective for reducing post-operative nausea, but not vomiting.* The Cochrane review included various means of stimulating P6, including acupuncture, electro-acupuncture, transcutaneous nerve stimulation, laser stimulation, acustimulation device and acupressure; it did not comment on whether one or more forms of stimulation were more effective. EBM reviewer Bandolier (journal)|Bandolier said that P6 in two studies showed 52% of patients with control having a success, compared with 75% with P6.* One author of an article published in the Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine disagreed.*A Cochrane Collaboration review found that massage provided some long-term benefit for low back pain, and said: It seems that acupressure or pressure point massage techniques provide more relief than classic (Swedish) massage, although more research is needed to confirm this.*Quackwatch includes acupressure in a list of methods which have no "rational place" as massage therapy and states that practitioners "may also use irrational diagnostic methods to reach diagnoses that do not correspond to scientific concepts of health and disease."*

Acupressure work theory

A variant system known as two point acupressure attempts to bypass a blockage of vital flow by using one acupoint to create a link with one of the collateral meridians, and then using one additional acupoint to stimulate or reduce the flow around the obstruction.

Criticism of TCM theory

Clinical use of acupressure frequently relies on the conceptual framework of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). There is no physically verifiable anatomical or histological basis for the existence of acupuncture points or meridian (Chinese medicine)|meridians.* Proponents reply that TCM is a prescientific system that continues to have practical relevance. Acupuncturists tend to perceive TCM concepts in functional rather than structural terms (e.g., as being useful in guiding evaluation and care of patients).*

Instruments

There are several different instruments for applying nonspecific pressure by rubbing, rolling, or applying pressure on the reflex zones of the body. The acuball is a small ball made of rubber with protuberances that is heatable. It is used to apply pressure and relieve muscle and joint pain. The energy roller is a small cylinder with protuberances. It is held between the hands and rolled back and forth to apply acupressure. The foot roller (also "krupa chakra") is a round, cylindrical roller with protuberances. It is placed on the floor and the foot is rolled back and forth over it. The power mat (also pyramid mat) is a mat with small pyramid-shaped bumps that you walk on. The spine roller is a bumpy roller containing magnets that is rolled up and down the spine. The Teishein is one of the original nine classical acupuncture needles described in the original texts of acupuncture. Even though it is described as an acupuncture needle it did not pierce the skin. It is used to apply rapid percussion pressure to the points being treated.*

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* This article is updated daily from Wikipedia. It may contain minor formatting errors.
For the original content and references, click here. Last update: 8/19/2013.

 
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